On the Properties of the Content that Rocks

By now, everyone is doing it. I think it is safe to say that content marketing does not make any difference. What matters is compelling content.

According to Google, 90% of any customer journeys now span at least five different channels. A very fundamental goal in content marketing should be to reach the customer on each relevant touchpoint over the journey. But in addition to reaching out to the right people at the right time, what does it take for content to create an impact?

I recently wrote in this blog about the need for proper content management. Content remains king, and for content to rule, content management is very important.

But I said very little about what best content is made of.

As a rule of thumb, of course, all of the content online must be very brief, focused, distinctive and memorable. And in order to create leads, there should be a clear call to action involved.

Making it a point to set these parameters as your internal content goals makes a lot of sense.

Identifying your own goals is of course important, but what really makes all the difference when it comes to your content, is identifying the goals of the target audiences. People are rarely online just browsing and prowling around, in fact, in the most common case they are online in order to get something done, and using a search engine or one of their favourite sites to do that.

And this is when your content must come through as compelling.

Successful content meets the target audiences needs and attempts to fulfill them. Based on the identified goals of each customer segment, it should be easy to plan the general themes that will be discussed with the target audience, and to start creating the editorial calendar. The customer’s goals may be quite abstract in some cases, and, of course, in some cases they are not.

It seems to me, however, that the abstract goals related to purchasing a product or using a service dominate our decision-making over the customer journey. According to Joseph Pine and James Gilmore, the authors of the “Experience Economy”, the most desirable customer experiences, and the ones that we are also willing to pay more for, are ”transformative” in nature, employing our emotions.

Emotions dominate most aspects of our lives. Having multiple devices with internet access does little in the way of solving our emotional issues. But the content we connect with online can certainly be of assistance here. Tapping to the power of the positive emotions and focusing on the potential for a transformative customer experience is what should drive content creation.

Read more about the overarching trends that will shape next year in content marketing: http://hub.uberflip.com/h/i/160667652-7-ways-content-marketing-will-evolve-in-2016

 

Author: Iiris Konttinen

I am a digital service design and digital marketing professional based in Helsinki, Finland.